an album

n.b. much of what's below is mostly moot. that is, you can no longer purchase the album here, though all that's said about the album's quality holds true. what's happened is that a very nice record label, Stand Up! Records, has, in its infinite wisdom, decided to purchase the rights to my album. they've recorded such exhaustingly incredible comics such as Doug Stanhope, Maria Bamford and David Cross. now they've taken me on too, so who the hell knows what's what. anyway, it'll be rereleased soon. until then, please feel free to feel uncertain for not having purchased the album earlier, when it was still a thing, a cool thing

 

some album reviews parts and album pricing talk

 

'outlandishly harsh and thought-provoking...a surreal warmth...a rare, endearing blend of stand-up and stand-off...works on the highest level'  -Exclaim

'nihilistic and death-dark...you wonder if you should actually be laughing...part of this album's weird sense of messed-up glee'  -The Comedy Network

'understated absurdity...brutally funny truths that are wry and strange and eccentric and savagely honest'  -The Scene Magazine

'piquant and twistedly droll...self-deprecation to another level'  -Montreal Gazette

'from happiness to unhappiness'  -Schlemiel in Theory

'one hell of a good CD'  -The Serious Comedy Site

 

with what's digital, what property or intellectual property* in particular is or means is new. rethought rights or restrictions appurtenant, etc. also, value reconsidered. that is, why is an album X dollars? what does X mean? or hold? for whom?

less abstractly, it is a different thing for a starving artist or student than it is for a man or different man with a woman or child and mortgage to part with X. or, differently, in a way, for me X may be a lot, while for you X is not a lot

that said, the album is being sold for whatever above just below a dollar you are willing to pay. if you have so little money, it is ok to pay a dollar. if you have so much money, it is probably not ok for you to pay a dollar. as I say in the album, ethics is ambiguous, but I think that the idea of creating something like comedy is that so many are able to watch and listen to and appreciate the comedy, while the person creating the comedy is fairly rewarded for his efforts by those who watch and listen to the comedy, in such a way that, if the comedy is good, he is able to continue to make more comedy. what is just or fair is something for the kids to sort out am I right, but you do need to see this comedy, and I do need to eat and make more comedy

I do not know your situation, but I am suggesting a suggested price of ten dollars. the reviews above are come by honestly I don't have to tell you, and you will receive both an audio and HD video digital download of the album. (in other words, you will receive what are in effect an album and movie.) (incidentally, the album was shot by my good cinematographer friend David Gelston. he owns a camera so good that he's paid by others who make movies just to use the camera. it is, so far as I understand things, how he pays for the camera. also, that's the camera that we used. also, David understands comedy)

in order to make this purchase, you will first have to click on the BUY CLICK ETC button below. from there you will be able to purchase the album for a dollar. after that, you will have the option of clicking on the 'REST OF THE VALUE' button and paying whatever above the dollar you pay. (technically, you can go the the 'REST OF THE VALUE' button only and give what would basically just be a donation, but there's no need)

you can also just go to iTunes or wherever else (to rate the album, for sure, which is good) and pay them whatever they're asking and they keep most of the money and you don't even get the video, but that's not recommended. and I'm sorry for all of the information you have to enter to make the purchase, but it's out of my hands and I don't do anything with it anyway. really, it's just credit card information. it's out there as it is

 

*speaking of intellectual property, here's a little post-mortem I wrote, when a student, after completing a placement with the McGill Centre for Intellectual Property Policy (CIPP). I'd kind of given up on school at that point